Food series to help students understand where their food comes from

foodSeriesINTERNET

(Graphic By Autumn Mariano)

This semester Weber State is hosting a food series, which includes public speakers, movie screenings and volunteer opportunities. These events will help students understand some of the issues that come with food.

This series on food is part of a larger series called the engaged learning series. The engaged learning series seeks to engage the campus in conversation on actions of social concern. In previous years WSU has focused on air and water.

“I think it benefits students by raising information about issues students care about,” said Sarah Steimel, engaged learning series coordinator. “We all eat several times a day, so it’s important to think about how to give ourselves high quality food, where that food comes from and how to provide nutrition for a family on a budget.”

The first event will be hosted Sept. 16 in Elizabeth Hall room 229. “Ingredients: Who’s Your Farmer?” will be screening from noon to 1:15 p.m. This film helps students realize where their food comes from.

Another beneficial activity that students can participate in is the canned food drive to stock the food pantry on campus. This will provide direct help for the students who don’t have an adequate amount of food on a daily basis. Not only does this series give students the chance to help their peers, but there are opportunities to help the larger community as well. On Oct. 8, students will be given the opportunity to volunteer at the Ogden Preparatory Academy.

“I loved the variety that the series gave students,” said Livvy Gerrish, via email, a previous series attendee. “There was something for everyone. Whether it was a film screening, a presentation or a service project, it gave every student an opportunity to get involved.”

Gerrish continues to say that students should attend this series because it gives them an idea of what is going on in their world and gives them the opportunity to promote positive change here on campus. Students can become involved in this series by checking out the events on the Center for Community Engaged Learning’s website or stop by their office in the Union building. They are always looking for students who are interested in attending an event or volunteering.

“My interest with regards to food are the issues with food production, local food, pesticides in food and the impact of agricultural in the environment,” said Alice Mulder, chair of environmental issues committee at WSU. “It certainly ties in with the interest of personal health.”

Mulder continues to say that students should get engaged with the series and if they can connect this series with their academics it could be beneficial.

“Students should attend the series because it gives them an insight into the world they are living in,” said Gerrish, via email. “Things are happening around them and they are easy to miss unless you are paying attention. This series gives students an easy way to be  a part of what is happening around them and find ways to promote positive change in their own community and lives.”

Correction: The name of Sarah Steimel was incorrect in earlier versions of this story.

You may also like...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *